The 9 Eye vitamins : Lutein and Zeaxanthin

If you’re like most people, you’re wondering, “Do vitamins for vision work?” The simple answer is, as we’ve seen with Vitamin A in carrots, yes…but in varying degrees. There are vitamins for vision loss that you can take, but none of them produce miraculous results.

Getting enough vitamins is important at every age, especially natural vitamins in your food. The functions of vitamins can be numerous. Their benefits are evident.  

About the author of below information i forward you to the  healthline site

 

 

 Vitamins Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Lutein and zeaxanthin are part of the carotenoid family, a group of beneficial compounds synthesized by plants.
Both of these carotenoids can be found in the macula and retina of your eyes, where they help filter potentially harmful blue light, thus protecting your eyes from damage (28Trusted Source).
Several studies suggest that these plant compounds may prevent cataracts and prevent or slow the progression of AMD (29Trusted Source, 30Trusted Source).
A randomized, controlled study found potential benefits of lutein for people with cataracts. Over two years, those taking supplements containing 15 mg of lutein three times per week experienced improvements in vision (31Trusted Source).
Recommended daily intakes and safe supplemental doses have not been established for these compounds. However, up to 20 mg of lutein per day for 6 months has been used in studies without adverse effects (32).
Nonetheless, supplements may not be necessary. As little as 6 mg of lutein and zeaxanthin may yield benefits, and a diet rich in fruits and vegetables naturally provides this amount. Cooked spinach, kale and collard greens are particularly high in these carotenoids (32).

Summary

Lutein and zeaxanthin are beneficial plant compounds that may help prevent AMD and cataracts. No recommended daily intakes have been established, but a diet high in fruits and vegetables can provide plenty of these nutrients.